10 BOOKS FOR OVER THINKERS

If you’ve recently had a breakup, this list is for you!

Check out the 10 best books to read after a breakup recommended to you by 6 experts.

Discover ways on how to get back on your feet stronger and wiser.


1.You're Too Good to Feel This Bad by Nate Dallas

The most comprehensive, practical, and concise guide to total wellness you will ever read.

This book is a treasure chest of insights and strategies for the capable over-achiever. It's a summation of the useful parts of the 25 other books you need to read, without the fluff.



You don't belong in the "mediocre middle" with everyone else: exhausted, stressed, and unfulfilled.
You're Too Good to Feel This Bad, and you know it.
In this book, Nate Dallas shares his eye-opening, personal experiment to escape the cultural epidemic of anxiety and entrapment. In his unabashed, down-to-earth style, he presents an entertaining and enlightening journey, challenging other over-achievers to break away from cultural norms. Combining potent insights from multiple disciplines, he distills complex processes into practical, achievable steps designed to elevate your life to an all-time high.
Phase 1 - Physiology (sleep, breathing, nutrition, & exercise)
Phase 2 - Psychology (human needs, pattern breaking, mindset, & meditation) Phase 3 - Life Application (recreation, money, work, systems, & relationships)
It's sure to generate a few laughs, while challenging you in meaningful ways. Throughout the process, you will think, see, understand, and feel like never before.
Buckle your seat belt and don't look back.
You're going to love this ride!

 

2. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
by Stephen Covey

When Stephen Covey first released The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, the book became an instant rage because people suddenly got up and took notice that their lives were headed off in the wrong direction; and more than that, they realized that there were so many simple things they could do in order to navigate their life correctly. This book was wonderful education for people, education in how to live life effectively and get closer to the ideal of being a ‘success’ in life.

But not everyone understands Stephen Covey’s model fully well, or maybe there are some people who haven’t read it yet. This is definitely true because we still see so much failure all around us. Now, I am not saying that by using Covey’s model, or anyone else’s model for that matter, you can become a sure-shot success, but at least we should have seen many more successes around us already judging by the number of copies the book has sold! So, where is the shortcoming?

There are two main problems here, and we are talking only about the people who have read the book already. The first problem is that most people are too lazy to implement the ideals of Stephen Covey in their lives. They consider his masterpiece of a book as a mere coffee-table book or a book that you use for light reading when you are traveling and then forget all about it. They do not realize that this book contains life-changing information. Or, they take the information and do not make the effort to actually utilize it so that it becomes knowledge for them.

The second problem is that a lot of people have a myopic view of Covey’s ideals. These are people who are impressed by the book already. If you ask them what the seven habits are, they can rattle them off end to end, but then they miss the larger picture. They do not understand that Covey was trying to tell more than he wrote in words. There are hidden implications in this book, yes, and a lot of people have just failed to see through them.

That is what we are trying to do. We are trying to show you how Covey’s book, or rather, his model, was a complete model in itself. There was nothing amiss about it. If you implement it, there should be no aspect of your life that should go untouched. The only thing is that you have to understand these ideals and try to implement them in your life.

But, before we barge into that area, it is extremely important to understand what these ideals are. What was the model that was propounded by Stephen Covey in his mega-famous book? We shall begin by trying to understand his model first, and then interpret it in such a way that it pertains to every aspect of our life

 

“Every so often a book comes along that not only alters the lives of readers but leaves an imprint on the culture itself. The 7 Habits is one of those books.”

“Covey’s masterpiece, if it hasn’t changed the world, has influenced millions of readers who can and will make our planet more peaceful and prosperous and prepared and purposeful.”

 

Relatable Quote:“Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.”

3. How to Stop Worrying and Start Living
by Dale Carnegie

Through Dale Carnegie’s six-million-copy bestseller recently revised, millions of people have been helped to overcome the worry habit. Dale Carnegie offers a set of practical formulas you can put to work today. In our fast-paced world—formulas that will last a lifetime!


 

Discover how to:
-Eliminate fifty percent of business worries immediately
-Reduce financial worries
-Avoid fatigue
-Add one hour a day to your waking life
-Find yourself and be yourself—remember there is no one else on earth like you!
How to Stop Worrying and Start Living deals with fundamental emotions and ideas. It is fascinating to read and easy to apply. Let it change and improve you. There’s no need to live with worry and anxiety that keep you from enjoying a full, active and happy life!

 

Relatable Quote: “When we hate our enemies, we are giving them power over us: power over our sleep, our appetites, our blood pressure, our health, and our happiness.”

4. Brain Rules
by John Medina

 

Most of us have no idea what’s really going on inside our heads. Yet brain scientists have uncovered details every business leader, parent, and teacher should know—like the need for physical activity to get your brain working its best.

How do we learn? What exactly do sleep and stress do to our brains? Why is multi-tasking a myth? Why is it so easy to forget—and so important to repeat new knowledge? Is it true that men and women have different brains?
In Brain Rules, Dr. John Medina, a molecular biologist, shares his lifelong interest in how the brain sciences might influence the way we teach our children and the way we work. In each chapter, he describes a brain rule—what scientists know for sure about how our brains work—and then offers transformative ideas for our daily lives.
Medina’s fascinating stories and infectious sense of humor breathe life into brain science. You’ll learn why Michael Jordan was no good at baseball. You’ll peer over a surgeon’s shoulder as he proves that most of us have a Jennifer Aniston neuron. You’ll meet a boy who has an amazing memory for music but can’t tie his own shoes.
You will discover how:
Every brain is wired differently
Exercise improves cognition
We are designed to never stop learning and exploring
Memories are volatile
Sleep is powerfully linked with the ability to learn
Vision trumps all of the other senses
Stress changes the way we learn
In the end, you’ll understand how your brain really works—and how to get the most out of it.


Relatable Quote: “What you do and learn in life physically changes what your brain looks like—it literally rewires it.”

 

5. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson

In this generation-defining self-help guide, a superstar blogger cuts through the crap to show us how to stop trying to be "positive" all the time so that we can truly become better, happier people.

For decades, we’ve been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F**k positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let’s be honest, shit is f**ked and we have to live with it."

In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn’t sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is—a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k is his antidote to the coddling, let’s-all-feel-good mindset that has infected American society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up.

Manson makes the argument, backed both by academic research and well-timed poop jokes, that improving our lives hinges not on our ability to turn lemons into lemonade, but on learning to stomach lemons better. Human beings are flawed and limited—"not everybody can be extraordinary, there are winners and losers in society, and some of it is not fair or your fault." Manson advises us to get to know our limitations and accept them. Once we embrace our fears, faults, and uncertainties, once we stop running and avoiding and start confronting painful truths, we can begin to find the courage, perseverance, honesty, responsibility, curiosity, and forgiveness we seek.

There are only so many things we can give a f**k about so we need to figure out which ones really matter, Manson makes clear. While money is nice, caring about what you do with your life is better, because true wealth is about experience. A much-needed grab-you-by-the-shoulders-and-look-you-in-the-eye moment of real-talk, filled with entertaining stories and profane, ruthless humor, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F**k is a refreshing slap for a generation to help them lead contented, grounded lives.

 

“Resilience, happiness and freedom come from knowing what to care about--and most importantly, what not to care about. This is a masterful, philosophical and practical book that will give readers the wisdom to be able to do just that.”

“Mark’s ability to dig deep and offer amazing, yet counter-intuitive, insight into the challenges of life makes him one of my favorite writers, and this book is his best work yet.”

 

Relatable Quote: “Who you are is defined by what you’re willing to struggle for.”

6. The Untethered Soul
by Michael A. Singer

 

Who are you? When you start to explore this question, you find out how elusive it really is. Are you a physical body? A collection of experiences and memories? A partner to relationships? Each time you consider aspects of yourself, you realize that there is much more to you than any of these can define.

In this book, spiritual teacher Michael Singer explores the question of who we are and arrives at the conclusion that our identity is to be found in our consciousness, the fact of our ability to observe ourselves and the world around us. By tapping into traditions of meditation and mindfulness, Singer shows how the development of consciousness can enable us all to dwell in the present moment and let go of painful thoughts and memories that keep us from achieving happiness and self-realization.

Divided into five parts, the book offers a frank and friendly discussion of consciousness and how we can develop it. In part one, he examines the notion of self and the inner dialogue that all of us live with. Part two examines the experience of energy as it flows through us and works to show readers how to open their hearts to the energy of experience that permeates their lives. Ways to overcome tendencies to close down to the rest of the world are the subject of part three. Enlightenment and the embrace of universal consciousness are the subject of part four. And finally, in part five, Singer returns to daily life and the pursuit of "unconditional happiness." Throughout, the book maintains a light and engaging tone, free from heavy dogma and prescriptive religious references. The easy exercises that figure in each chapter help readers experience the ideas that Singer presents.

 

"East is East and West is West, but Michael Singer bridges these two great traditions in a radiant treatise on how to succeed in life from our spiritual quest to our everyday tribulations. Freud said that life was composed of love and work. With great eloquence, wit, and compelling logic, Singer s brilliant book completes this thought by showing them to be two poles of the same selfless devotion."

In the book, The Untethered Soul, Michael Singer takes you step-by-step through the process of Gyana, the Yoga of the Intellect, to the Source. Moreover, he does it with elegant simplicity. Read this book carefully and you will get more than a glimpse of eternity.

 

Relatable Quote: “There is nothing more important to true growth than realizing that you are not the voice of the mind - you are the one who hears it.”

7. Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking
by Susan Cain

At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over working in teams. It is to introverts—Rosa Parks, Chopin, Dr. Seuss, Steve Wozniak—that we owe many of the great contributions to society.



 

In Quiet, Susan Cain argues that we dramatically undervalue introverts and shows how much we lose in doing so. She charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal throughout the twentieth century and explores how deeply it has come to permeate our culture. She also introduces us to successful introverts—from a witty, high-octane public speaker who recharges in solitude after his talks, to a record-breaking salesman who quietly taps into the power of questions. Passionately argued, superbly researched, and filled with indelible stories of real people, Quiet has the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how they see themselves.
Now with Extra Libris material, including a reader’s guide and bonus content.

 

“An important book that should embolden anyone who’s ever been told, ‘Speak up!’”
“Cain offers a wealth of useful advice for teachers and parents of introverts. . . . Quiet should interest anyone who cares about how people think, work, and get along, or wonders why the guy in the next cubicle acts that way. It should be required reading for introverts (or their parents) who could use a boost to their self-esteem.”

 

Relatable Quote: “There's zero correlation between being the best talker and having the best ideas.”

8. Overthinking by Robert Leary

Struggling with stress and anxiety? Feel overwhelmed by the inundation of information you receive from your phone, TV, and radio? Or do you want to eliminate negative thinking?

Here's the deal...If you always feel overwhelmed and can't calm yourself down to get a good night’s sleep, then you need to examine how negative thoughts are impacting your lifestyle.

 

Overthinking is a step-by-step guide to forming healthier habits for your mind, body, and spirit. You will learn to take a step back and evaluate how you currently live your life before creating a plan to remove those sources and triggers for overthinking and replace them with positive influences and powerful habits.

DOWNLOAD: Overthinking -- How to Declutter and Unfu*k Your Mind

You will learn :

Common Causes of Mental Clutter
Powerful Methods to Declutter your Mind and Fill it Back Up With Healthy, Productive Habits and Encouragement The Best Strategies to Begin Removing Negative Influences From Your Life The Importance of Sleep and WHY you Should Introduce New, Healthy Sleeping Habits The Benefit of Mindfulness and Meditation Techniques How to Declutter Your Environment to Reflect the Positive Changes You’re Making in Your Life #1 Tips to Eliminate Bad Relationships How to Address Information Overload in Your Life

No matter where you are in life or where you think you need to be, there is a pathway to clarity waiting for you to discover and implement in your life. In Overthinking, we look closely together not only on where you’re going, but where you’ve been and how to address the clutter in your mind right now before learning to refill it with positivity, mindfulness, and proven tools for success and happiness.

Would You Like To Know More? Download now to stop worrying, deal with anxiety, and rewire your brain!
Grab your copy today! Scroll up and click the "Buy Now" button.

 

Relatable Quote: “If society says I’m supposed to be here or there at this point in my life, that means I’ve failed and there is something wrong with me.”

9.Don't Overthink It by Anne Bogel

We've all been there: stuck in a cycle of what-ifs, plagued by indecision, paralyzed by the fear of getting it wrong. Nobody wants to live a life of constant overthinking, but it doesn't feel like something we can choose to stop doing. It feels like something we're wired to do, something we just can't escape. But is it?



Anne Bogel's answer is no. Not only can you overcome negative thought patterns that are repetitive, unhealthy, and unhelpful, you can replace them with positive thought patterns that will bring more peace, joy, and love into your life. In Don't Overthink It, you'll find actionable strategies that can make an immediate and lasting difference in how you deal with questions both small--Should I buy these flowers?--and large--What am I doing with my life? More than a book about making good decisions, Don't Overthink It offers you a framework for making choices you'll be comfortable with, using an appropriate amount of energy, freeing you to focus on all the other stuff that matters in life.

 

Relatable Quote:  “Sometimes I only pretend I don’t know what to do, because I don’t want to do it.”

10. The Worry Trick by David A. Carbonell

Anxiety is a powerful force. It makes us question ourselves and our decisions, causes us to worry about the future, and fills our days with dread and emotional turbulence. Based in acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), this book is designed to help you break the cycle of worry.

 

Worry convinces us there's danger, and then tricks us into getting into fight, flight, or freeze mode—even when there is no danger. The techniques in this book, rather than encouraging you to avoid or try to resist anxiety, shows you how to see the trick that underlies your anxious thoughts, and how avoidance can backfire and make anxiety worse.

If you’re ready to start observing your anxious feelings with distance and clarity—rather than getting tricked once again—this book will show you how.

 

"Dave Carbonell's clear emphasis on theory and techniques to address worry as process has made a profound difference in my work with anxious clients. His witty and wise approach provides specific interventions that a therapist can apply immediately--while avoiding the trap of running in circles when we try to challenge the content of our clients' worry themes."

 


Relatable Quote: “We will also do better when we can recognize the worry thoughts as signs of nervousness and anxiety, the same as an eye twitch or sweaty palms, rather than some important message about the future”