Chainsaw Man, Vol. 3

Chainsaw Man, Vol. 3

126.00 dh 106.00 dh
This is a review of the entire series.

Demons are running wild all over the world and plenty of devil hunters are willing to put their necks on the line for a good sum of money. The Yakuza is no exception to this rule. Stuck with a massive debt after losing his deadbeat dad and his home, a young boy who never received love or an education named Denji has no choice but to enlist his services in the Yakuza faction of hired hunters to earn his keep on the streets because he was never taught a better way of living. After coming across a chainsaw-dog demon in his line of work, an innocent creature that's all alone in the wilderness just like himself, the two band together for mutual survival. After being betrayed and murdered by the Yakuza, the demon dog fuses together with Denji's heart to save his live, creating a devilman: a being that is half human and half demon. Shortly after becoming the devilman fittingly named Chainsaw Man, Denji is hired by the Public Safety Devil Hunters to put his new powers to good use all the while being observed to make sure he doesn't lose his humanity and become a threat to mankind himself.

Now that he's actually in a position of comfort, stability and close connections with other people like himself, Denji starts to question his dreams, aspirations and desires for the first time in his life. He's curious about friends, family and sexual relationships. He's curious about the meaning of life and what role he serves in the grand scheme of things. Denji is essentially a newborn baby with the hormonal intuitiveness of an edgy teenager, bumbling around in a world of bizarre monsters and crazy people without a clue. The story is entirely from his point of view, so the lens we view the narrative is also completely absurd and unpredictable, which makes the tone feel incredibly different than the average dystopian nightmare. In comparison, everything seems oddly childlike, grotesquely humorous and utterly devoid of any kind of logic or reason. This isn't a bad thing by any means, the way the story is told perfectly reflects the nature of its main character and his own child-like view on otherwise complex problems.

Denji is a wacky, childish, unpredictable and reckless fool who makes all of his decisions on a whim which often leads to pure chaos. Never having any type of eduction or familial relationships, he quite literally has the attitude, mindset and emotional maturity of a toddler in a young man's body. Paired with ridiculous demon powers on top of this, his motivations are often laughably absurd and the plot continuously evolves with an equal amount of absurdity to match the demeanor of the protagonist. The story plays out similar to a Deadpool comic, constantly poking fun at the absolute batshittyness of its plot and protagonist all the while trying to constantly outdo itself be getting more and more insane and nonsensical with every chapter. Just like some Deadpool stories, it gets surprisingly emotional and philosophical at times as well.

Similar to the author's previous work Fire Punch, I had an almost identical outlook on the series as a whole. Most of the time, it's absurd and shocking just for the sake of being absurd and shocking, and that's not really a bad thing if you just want to go along with a surrealistic fever dream type of story that flexes its own ridiculousness every chance it gets. Just like Fire Punch however, around the 60% mark, the story gets so abstract, obscure and bizarre that it practically becomes uninterpretable. I had no idea what was going on during the entirety of the last 4 volumes or so and the ending left me wondering what the hell I just read.

In spite of its flaws and nearly incomprehensible finale, it's certainly entertaining overall and can be enjoyed simply because of how weird it is. Although he was a relatively simplistic character, I enjoyed Denji's awkward relationships with equally wacky characters throughout the story as he struggled to figure out how a human being is even supposed to think or act. I especially enjoyed his relationship with the demongirl Power who became his hilarious and bratty sister-figure and got into plenty of zany antics with him. Though their relationship was mostly played up for laughs, it had its touching moments as well. chainsawman..
Book Title Chainsaw Man, Vol. 3
Author Tatsuki Fujimoto
Type media > books
Date Published Jun 01, 2021
This is a review of the entire series.

Demons are running wild all over the world and plenty of devil hunters are willing to put their necks on the line for a good sum of money. The Yakuza is no exception to this rule. Stuck with a massive debt after losing his deadbeat dad and his home, a young boy who never received love or an education named Denji has no choice but to enlist his services in the Yakuza faction of hired hunters to earn his keep on the streets because he was never taught a better way of living. After coming across a chainsaw-dog demon in his line of work, an innocent creature that's all alone in the wilderness just like himself, the two band together for mutual survival. After being betrayed and murdered by the Yakuza, the demon dog fuses together with Denji's heart to save his live, creating a devilman: a being that is half human and half demon. Shortly after becoming the devilman fittingly named Chainsaw Man, Denji is hired by the Public Safety Devil Hunters to put his new powers to good use all the while being observed to make sure he doesn't lose his humanity and become a threat to mankind himself.

Now that he's actually in a position of comfort, stability and close connections with other people like himself, Denji starts to question his dreams, aspirations and desires for the first time in his life. He's curious about friends, family and sexual relationships. He's curious about the meaning of life and what role he serves in the grand scheme of things. Denji is essentially a newborn baby with the hormonal intuitiveness of an edgy teenager, bumbling around in a world of bizarre monsters and crazy people without a clue. The story is entirely from his point of view, so the lens we view the narrative is also completely absurd and unpredictable, which makes the tone feel incredibly different than the average dystopian nightmare. In comparison, everything seems oddly childlike, grotesquely humorous and utterly devoid of any kind of logic or reason. This isn't a bad thing by any means, the way the story is told perfectly reflects the nature of its main character and his own child-like view on otherwise complex problems.

Denji is a wacky, childish, unpredictable and reckless fool who makes all of his decisions on a whim which often leads to pure chaos. Never having any type of eduction or familial relationships, he quite literally has the attitude, mindset and emotional maturity of a toddler in a young man's body. Paired with ridiculous demon powers on top of this, his motivations are often laughably absurd and the plot continuously evolves with an equal amount of absurdity to match the demeanor of the protagonist. The story plays out similar to a Deadpool comic, constantly poking fun at the absolute batshittyness of its plot and protagonist all the while trying to constantly outdo itself be getting more and more insane and nonsensical with every chapter. Just like some Deadpool stories, it gets surprisingly emotional and philosophical at times as well.

Similar to the author's previous work Fire Punch, I had an almost identical outlook on the series as a whole. Most of the time, it's absurd and shocking just for the sake of being absurd and shocking, and that's not really a bad thing if you just want to go along with a surrealistic fever dream type of story that flexes its own ridiculousness every chance it gets. Just like Fire Punch however, around the 60% mark, the story gets so abstract, obscure and bizarre that it practically becomes uninterpretable. I had no idea what was going on during the entirety of the last 4 volumes or so and the ending left me wondering what the hell I just read.

In spite of its flaws and nearly incomprehensible finale, it's certainly entertaining overall and can be enjoyed simply because of how weird it is. Although he was a relatively simplistic character, I enjoyed Denji's awkward relationships with equally wacky characters throughout the story as he struggled to figure out how a human being is even supposed to think or act. I especially enjoyed his relationship with the demongirl Power who became his hilarious and bratty sister-figure and got into plenty of zany antics with him. Though their relationship was mostly played up for laughs, it had its touching moments as well. chainsawman..