Six Easy Pieces: Essentials of Physics Explained by Its Most Brilliant Teacher

Six Easy Pieces: Essentials of Physics Explained by Its Most Brilliant Teacher

130.00 dh 106.00 dh
Six Easy Pieces consists essentially of some of the initial lectures from the famous Feynman Lectures. The last chapter of this book, also taken from the lectures, is an introduction to quantum mechanics, namely the double-slit experiment. If you’ve never read anything from Feynman, here’s a good point to start.

This book is supposed to introduce the basic concepts of physics and is very easy to read. Feynman was a great teacher. His enthusiasm could captivate anyone, even in written words, and I always find myself listening to his enthusiastic voice inside my head. He was also famous for making scientific concepts understandable for anyone and you can very easily see his style here.

I had read the first Volume from the Feynman Lectures many years ago, so this was a nice read to get a reminding of how good they were. The best chapter of this book is definitely the last one, with Feynman demonstrating the double-slit experiment in a brilliant and accessible way. The only downside is that some of the things he mentions about particle physics might be a bit outdated. Otherwise, this is an excellent book.
Six Easy Pieces consists essentially of some of the initial lectures from the famous Feynman Lectures. The last chapter of this book, also taken from the lectures, is an introduction to quantum mechanics, namely the double-slit experiment. If you’ve never read anything from Feynman, here’s a good point to start.

This book is supposed to introduce the basic concepts of physics and is very easy to read. Feynman was a great teacher. His enthusiasm could captivate anyone, even in written words, and I always find myself listening to his enthusiastic voice inside my head. He was also famous for making scientific concepts understandable for anyone and you can very easily see his style here.

I had read the first Volume from the Feynman Lectures many years ago, so this was a nice read to get a reminding of how good they were. The best chapter of this book is definitely the last one, with Feynman demonstrating the double-slit experiment in a brilliant and accessible way. The only downside is that some of the things he mentions about particle physics might be a bit outdated. Otherwise, this is an excellent book.